Last edited by Voodoolmaran
Saturday, July 11, 2020 | History

7 edition of Religion in the Soviet Union. found in the catalog.

Religion in the Soviet Union.

Walter Kolarz

Religion in the Soviet Union.

by Walter Kolarz

  • 200 Want to read
  • 21 Currently reading

Published by St. Martin"s Press in [New York] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Soviet Union
    • Subjects:
    • Soviet Union -- Religion,
    • Soviet Union -- Church history

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliographical footnotes.

      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsBR936 .K58 1962
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxii, 518 p.
      Number of Pages518
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5843709M
      LC Control Number62000323
      OCLC/WorldCa6233828

      Nonetheless, religion is obviously still an important part of the lives of millions of Soviet citizens. According to recent estimates from the Soviet Council of Religious Affairs (the state organization that monitors all religious activities in the USSR), religious believers make up . The translation of Bayram Balci’s monograph Islam in Central Asia and the Caucasus since the Fall of the Soviet Union is an important contribution to the field of contemporary Islamic studies in this book explores the interaction between the newly-established independent states of Central Asia and Azerbaijan and the most important regional powers representing Islamic influence.

      Religious Policy in the Soviet Union. Religious Policy in the Soviet Union This book provides a sweeping and comprehensive analysis of the history of religion in the Soviet Union, tracing its fortunes through the chaos of the s, and the anti-religious persecution of Stalinism, to the.   The social roots of religion, the fear of the uncontrolled social forces which dominate the masses in their daily lives, "the impotence of the exploited classes in struggle with the exploiters"(Lenin), not only still exist in the Soviet Union, they are being strengthened as the degeneration of the Bureaucracy proceeds and the burdens which it.

      This book brings together fifteen of the West's leading scholars of religion in the USSR. Bringing much hitherto unknown material to light, the authors discuss the policy apparatus, programmes of atheisation and socialisation, cults and sects, and the world of Christianity. The former Soviet Union adopted _____ as its official religious policy. atheism Pork production is important in China, but not is countries with this type of religion.


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Religion in the Soviet Union by Walter Kolarz Download PDF EPUB FB2

Marx said religion was the opium of the people – and in the Soviet Union, atheism became government policy, enforced by the state and encouraged by. Christel Lane has written the first sociological study of religion in a communist and militantly atheist society.

Christian Religion in the Soviet Union is the result of a detailed examination of Soviet sociological sources and the legally and illegally published reports of religious bodies or individuals, backed up by the observations of the author and of other Western visitors to the by:   Christel Lane has written the first sociological study of religion in a communist and militantly atheist society.

Christian Religion in the Soviet Union is the result of a detailed examination of Soviet sociological sources and the legally and illegally published reports of religious bodies or individuals, backed up by the observations of the author and of other Western vi3/5.

Making use of newly available archive material, this book provides the first systematic and accessible overview of church-state relations in the Soviet Union. John Anderson explores the shaping of Soviet religious policy from the death of Stalin until the collapse of communism, and considers the place of religion in the post-Soviet by: The Soviet government's attitude to religion in theory and practice is shown in this wide-ranging collection of annotated texts from the newly-opened archives.

Included are documents from the KGB, the. Religion has become increasingly important in the sociopolitical life of countries in the former Soviet Union.

This volume of essays examines how religion affects conflict and stability in the region and provides recommendations to policymakers. In the first place there is no question of religion dying out in the Soviet Union as would be the case in a society which was advancing towards Socialism.

Thus is the lie given, by this fact alone, to the Stalinist claims to have “finally and irrevocably” established Socialism in the Soviet Union. Church-state relations have undergone a number of changes during the seven decades of the existence of the Soviet Union.

In the s the state was politically and financially weak and its edicts often ignored, but the s saw the beginning of an era of systematic anti-religious persecution. There was some relaxation in the last decade of Stalin's rule, but under Khrushchev the pressure on.

Books That Inspired The Soviet Union The Communist Manifesto: A Modern Edition (Karl Marx & Friedrich Engels) The Communist Manifesto is probably one of the books that has impacted the world the most. The book is an introduction to Marxism, an ideology that inspired Lenin to lead the masses to rise up against the ruling elite and try to work for a fairer society for the working classes.

OCLC Number: Description: xii, pages illustrations, portraits, maps, facsimiles 23 cm: Contents: The survival of religion in the Soviet Union --The Russian Orthodox Church --The fight for national Orthodox churches --The old believers --The Armenian Church --Moscow and Rome --Eastern Catholics --Western Protestantism I (Lutherans, Calvinists, Mennonites) --Western Protestantism II.

The constitution of the former Soviet Union nominally In the 10th century Prince Vladimir I, who was converted by missionaries from Byzantium, adopted Christianity as the official religion for Russia, and for nearly 1, years thereafter the Russian Orthodox church.

After the revolution, the Bolsheviks found themselves in control of all of Russia. With political power in their hands, they expanded their ambitions to include restructuring the Russian.

This book does not deal with theology. It is an attempt to provide a fuller understanding of Russian reality by drawing attention to what might be called 'the other Russia', the Russia of the believers.

I did not begin writing this book with any preconceived ideas about the strength of religion in the Soviet Union.

Under Khrushchev it became illegal to teach religion to your own children. From to the perestroika period of the s, the more religion. Get this from a library. Religion in the Soviet Union. [Walter Kolarz] -- Comprehensive survey of the situation of various religious groups in the U.S.S.R., including Christian, Moslem, Buddhist, Jewish, with contemporary developments under the Khrushchev regime.

Christian Religion in the Soviet Union A Sociological Study (Book): Lane, Christel: Christel Lane has written the first sociological study of religion in a communist and militantly atheist society.

Christian Religion in the Soviet Union is the result of a detailed examination of Soviet sociological sources and the legally and illegally published reports of religious bodies or individuals. Making use of newly-available archival material, this book provides the first systematic and accessible overview of church-state relations in the Soviet Union.

John Anderson explores the shaping of Soviet religious policy from the death of Stalin until the collapse of communism, and considers the problems in this area facing the newly-independent states of the former Soviet Union.

The Soviet government reports that religion is definitely on the decline in the USSR. And given the persistent harassment of the state, one might expect that—but trustworthy sources say it isn't so.

That is certainly true of Soviet atheism, and it is also true of Russian Orthodoxy. Smolkin’s book helps us appreciate that in Russia today, as in the Soviet Union years ago, official state faiths mask a more complicated reality.

Gene Zubovich is a visiting fellow at the University of Toronto. He writes on the history of religion and politics. The Communist Party of the Soviet Union arose from the Bolshevik wing of the Russian Social Democratic Workers’ Party (RSDWP). The Bolsheviks, organized inwere led by Vladimir I.

Lenin, and they argued for a tightly disciplined organization of professional revolutionaries who were governed by democratic centralism and were dedicated to achieving the dictatorship of the proletariat. A union of multiple subnational Soviet republics, its government and economy were highly centralized.

The Soviet Union was a one-party state, governed by the Communist Party with Moscow as its capital.Type: BOOK - Published: - Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group Get Books Examines what daily life was like for ordinary people in the Soviet Union from todiscussing government and law, the military, economy, class structure, housing, education, health care, the arts, religion.

Throughout the existence of the Soviet Union, several antireligious campaigns were carried out in order to eliminate religion from the public square.

One of the worst of these was the antireligious campaign carried out under Nikita Khrushchev, who revoked the parental right to instruct children in the Faith.